Buñuelos de Viento (Mexican Rosette Fritters)

Buñuelos de Viento are Mexican fritters super crispy that practically melt in your mouth! Those sweet treats are perfect to enjoy with hot chocolate and they make the perfect holiday gift for family and friends.

Mexican buñuelos de viento piled, with Christmas lights on the background.

About

Buñuelos de Viento are rosette-shaped fritters made of a light batter, fried until crispy, and then coated with cinnamon and sugar. They are popular in Mexican and other Latin-American countries.

The name translates into wind fritters and we believe it’s because of their light and fragile texture. They literally melt in your mouth!

Buñuelos are one of those recipes Spaniards brought to Mexico during Colonial times, even though it is believed those treats have an older origin coming from the Middle East.

Even though you probably heard about buñuelos before and have seen them with the regular tortilla shape, buñuelos de viento are recognizable because of their cute and flower-like shape.

Buñuelos de viento on a wire rack with Christmas ornaments scattered around.

The distinctive appearance is made by using a rosette-shaped iron mold called buñuelera. Even though it looks similar to the Scandinavian rosette mold, they are different.

However, for convenience and because they are easier to find, you can use the nordic mold. In some Mexican households, those fritters are even made using a bulky beans masher!

Usually, these Mexican fritters are served in December during the Posadas using also other shapes like stars, snowflakes, hearts, etc. They surely make a wonderful gift for the holidays.

Ingredients

  • Flour: Use all-purpose flour.
  • Eggs: I used 2 medium eggs, if you use large eggs you will need to add less water.
  • Milk: Use whole milk.
  • Water: To make the batter.
  • Butter: You will need unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled.
  • Sugar: Granulated white sugar.
  • Baking powder: Just a little bit for adding an airy texture to the fritters.
  • Vanilla: For flavor, use vanilla extract or paste.
  • Salt: Just a pinch

For coating:

  • Sugar: Use regular granulated sugar or brown sugar for a deeper taste.
  • Cinnamon: Use powdered cinnamon, you can also find it as canela en polvo in Mexican supermarkets.

How To Make Buñuelos de Viento

Before starting, prepare the following:

  • A wire rack over a baking sheet or a plate lined with paper towels.
  • A mixture of sugar + cinnamon powder on a plate. Or a strainer with confectioner’s sugar for dusting.
  • A plate with 2-3 paper towels to clean the excess oil from the mold.

Add flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Using a balloon whisk, mix the dry ingredients.

Mixing flour and other dry ingredients in a bowl.

Make a well in the center of the flour and add eggs, water, melted butter, and vanilla extract. Mix to combine.

Mixing eggs, vanilla, butter, and water into the bowl with flour.

Now, add the milk while mixing slowly until you’ll have a runny and smooth batter with no lumps left.

A collage with two photos of making the buñuelos de viento batter in a bowl.

Heat about 1-inch of frying oil in a pan over medium heat. Check up the temperature with a toothpick as suggested in this article.

First, dip the rosette mold into the hot oil for half a minute to heat it up. Lift it and shake it a bit, then place it on the paper-lined plate to absorb excess oil.

the rosette mold immersed into the oil in a pan.

Now submerge the mold into the batter but do not allow the mixture to go over the mold, make sure is immersed right to the top border.

The rosette mold immersed into the buñuelos de viento batter in a bowl.

Lift the mold and quickly dip it into the hot oil. Keep it in the oil for about 10 seconds, then gently shake it so the fried buñuelo will slowly release.

A collage with two photos of immersing the mold with batter into the oil and lifting it to detach the buñuelo.
*Buñuelos molde*

Tip: If needed, use a fork to help to detach the buñuelo from the mold.

Repeat the steps to make 2 more buñuelos and fry them until nicely golden brown, flipping them once or twice.

Nicely fried buñuelos de viento in a pan.

Remove from the oil with a slotted spoon and place over the rack with the hollow side down.

Buñuelos de viento on a wire rack.

Allow to slightly cool down and then carefully coat with the sugar and cinnamon mixture or dust them with the confectioner’s sugar (read notes).

Coating buñuelos de viento in a plate with a mixture of sugar and ground cinnamon.

Repeat the steps until you use all the batter adding more oil if needed. As you practice, you’ll see it will be easier to make 4-5 at a time.

Useful Recipe Notes

  • For nicely and evenly golden fritters, always keep an eye on the oil temperature. Too hot oil will burn the batter in seconds, too cold will make them absorb too much oil.
  • Make sure you use a flat container to place the batter, if you use a rounded bottom bowl it will be more complicated to dip the mold into the mixture.
  • Do not fully immerse the iron mold into the batter or it will create a seal as you dip it into the hot oil, making it almost impossible for the buñuelo to fall off.
  • To speed up the cooking, make sure you always place the mold back into the hot oil while finishing frying the bunuelos.
  • The sugar and cinnamon mixture sticks even if the fritters are slightly cold because of the oil. But, if you want to powder them with confectioner’s sugar, make sure they’re at room temperature or the sugar will melt.
  • Do the coating with care as the fritters are delicate and fragile.
Buñuelos de viento dusted with confectioner's sugar and placed on a wooden table with Christmas ornaments around.
Receta de Buñuelos de Viento

How To Serve

To follow the tradition of posadas, in Mexico buñuelos de viento are usually served for la merienda with a cup of Mexican hot chocolate, champurrado, or atole. Is surely a festive way of eating them!

But, since they are also found all year round in food markets and fairs, you can eat them as a regular snack any time of the day.

You can choose various ways for serving them, for example, simple as they are, dredging them in granulated sugar, or dusted with confectioner’s sugar.

Also, you can use them as a topping for ice cream, pies, or cakes. When we talk about those buñuelos de viento, think of a churro, which you can serve in many ways.

Close-up of Buñuelos de Viento dusted with confectioner's sugar.

How To Store And Reheat

For storing the leftovers, first line an airtight container with kitchen paper towels, place the fritters and store them at room temperature for up to 4 days.

If they are not dusted or coated with sugar you can reheat them in the preheated oven at 250°F/125°C for 2 minutes until warm and crisp again.

But honestly, you don’t need to reheat them, there’s just something yummy and comforting about eating a leftover buñuelo whenever you want!

FAQ

Where can I buy the rosette mold?

You can find rosette molds to make bunuelos at Mexican local and online stores. They are also available on Amazon here: Buñuelera with handle and here: Rosette mold set.

How to make ahead?

You can make the batter up to 2 days ahead. Place in an airtight container and store in the fridge. When ready to make, you don’t even need the batter to reach room temperature, just proceed with the recipe as instructed.

Are those same as flat buñuelos?

No. Flat Mexican buñuelos are made with rolled and fried dough, while this recipe is made with a runny batter. The texture is different, even though the taste is pretty similar.

Are the nordic mold and buñueleras the same?

Actually no. Mexican buñueleras are larger and taller, while the nordic molds are smaller. However, you can make this recipe with either.

Watch The Video

Buñuelos de Viento with Christmas lights in the background.

Buñuelos de Viento (Mexican fritters)

author Maricruz
60 buñuelos de viento
Those Mexican buñuelos de viento are super crispy, light, and perfect to gift during the holidays. Learn how to make these Mexican rosette fritters at home with this super easy recipe!
prep 10 minutes
cook 20 minutes
total 30 minutes

Ingredients 

  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 Tbsp butter (melted)
  • 2 Tbsp granulated sugar
  • 2 medium eggs
  • ¼ cup water
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • oil for frying (as needed)

For coating

  • cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • confectioner's sugar (optional)

Instructions
 

  • Mix flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt in a large mixing bowl.
  • Add eggs, water, melted butter, and vanilla extract. Mix to combine.
  • Add the milk while mixing to combine all ingredients together until you’ll have a runny and smooth batter with no lumps.
  • Heat about 1-inch of frying oil in a pan over medium heat.
  • Dip the rosette mold into the hot oil for half a minute to heat it up. Lift it and shake it a bit, then place it on the paper-lined plate to absorb excess oil.
  • Submerge the mold into the batter but do not allow the mixture to go over the mold, make sure is immersed just to the top border.
  • Lift the mold and quickly dip it into the hot oil. Keep it in the oil for about 10 seconds, then gently shake it so the fried buñuelo will release.
  • Repeat the steps to make 2 more buñuelos and fry them until nicely gold, flipping them once or twice.
  • Remove from the oil with a slotted spoon and place over a wire rack with the hollow side down.
  • Repeat the steps until you use all the batter.
  • Coat buñuelos with the sugar and cinnamon mixture or dust them with the confectioner’s sugar (read notes) and enjoy.

Notes

  • For nicely and evenly golden fritters, always keep an eye on the oil temperature. Too hot oil will burn the batter in seconds, too cold will make them absorb too much oil.
  • Use a flat container to place the batter, if you use a rounded bottom bowl it will be more complicated to dip the mold into the mixture.
  • Do not fully immerse the iron mold into the batter or it will create a seal as you dip it into the hot oil, making it almost impossible for the buñuelo to fall off.
  • To speed up the cooking, make sure you always place the mold back into the hot oil while finishing frying the bunuelos.
  • The sugar and cinnamon mixture sticks even if the fritters are slightly cold because of the oil. But, if you want to powder them with confectioner’s sugar, make sure they’re at room temperature or the sugar will melt.
  • Do the coating with care as the fritters are delicate and fragile.
Nutrition Information
Serving: 1buñuelo | Calories: 37kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Trans Fat: 0.02g | Cholesterol: 7mg | Sodium: 20mg | Potassium: 12mg | Fiber: 0.1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 26IU | Calcium: 8mg | Iron: 0.2mg
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Recipe Rating




One Comment

  1. 5 stars
    I made the recipe yesterday as I had all ingredients at home. I must say those are the crispier and most delicious buñuelos de viento I’ve ever had.
    They are super simple to make, the steps are easily understandable even for people like me (I am not too good at cooking lol), and they taste AMAZING!

    I had a bit of trouble at the start as they burned out quickly :s but I knew it was because the oil was too hot, buñuelos were literally cooking as soon as I placed the mold into the oil but they would be a little raw in the hollows.

    So people, just keep an eye on the oil temperature, really, that’s the key! As soon as I got the right oil temperature, my buñuelos were perfect! I actually had to refrain from eating them straight from the oil lol

    Thank you so much for this wonderful recipe and the photos…I’m in love, I pinned them all haha they’re just gorgeous!